Tragic Kingdom: Issun…kinda

Picture it….

Sitting, huddled in a blanket, surrounded by nachos, fingers about to dance across the keyboard as if composing a rousing concerto as I rig like a mad man!

….then a hurricane comes, creates a storm, launches a lightning bolt down at my little ol’ cottage atop a big tall mountain and BEWM goes my computer’s motherboard and power supply. And my life for the next 5 days. Sad as that is.

Silver lining is I got a newer, better computer out of it, but it’s set me back a bit progress-wise. Ah well. I’ve decided to post what I did today anyway, between the other stuff, as some have expressed an interest in the rigging portion of it all. From here on in, I will likely be taking a break from Issun and TK in general, as I’ve been asked to be part of a small animation project and will be dedicating myself to that entirely, and using whatever spare time I have to (finally) build that website I keep talking about.

 

Orienting the joints before parenting

Testing the IK handles for the leg animations.

I did warn it wasn’t much 😛 Busy busy busy. On another note, this rig when it’s finished will of course be a bit more in-depth than the first one, which was basically made for a specific pose, one not very demanding at that. I decided to start from scratch, because rigs tend to be fickle things when working backward. That and they’re fun to build ❤

On another note, I just realized I never posted a screenshot of the very low-poly model after the textures and normal mapping were applied:

 

Base 16: Rigging

Rigging is something I used to be afraid of, until I dove right in and discarded all apprehension. It’s actually rather fun, once you get the hang of it! The start is pretty straight-forward. For now, I just need a very basic rig. When I have a clearer idea of what I’ll need this model for, I can go in and tailor the rig to the project.

Once the profile-view joints have been placed, I move on to the arms. This is where it gets a little annoying. I’ve left my model in a relaxed T-pose to help maintain proper deformation during animation. It’s probably the better way to rig, but it does complicate some thing a bit. Moving joints around and trying to align them perfectly takes some time, and Snapping only shortens the workload so much.

The hands are done next, aligning them both with the mesh and the axis of the joints as well.

And that’s pretty much it! I mirror the arm and leg joints over to the other side, which is literally just a few button clicks. Afterward, I start building in the controls with which to manipulate the rig.

Special thanks to Digital Tutors for showing me some tips and tricks along the way!